Category: Naval History

  • Learning to Win, a Hudson Institute Report

    I was pleased to contribute to a recent Hudson Institute report on operational innovation and the importance of learning to today’s U.S. Navy. The whole report is available in PDF at this URL. In my section, I focused on the importance of creating a learning organization by coupling individual learning outcomes to the Navy’s operational […]

  • Is War Getting More Complex?

    In a recent Modern War Institute series on Leadership in Future War, Dr. Cole Livieratos discussed the “changing context of war” and emphasized the importance of recognizing its complexity. The article is quite good; however, Livieratos’s emphasis on “increasing complexity” raised some hackles. Subtweets, like the one below, led to an active Twitter discussion about whether […]

  • Wait… wut?

    Twitter can be an amazing place. I happened on this tweet the other day and knew immediately what my response would be, but I also knew I couldn’t fit that response in a tweet. My biggest “Wait… wut?” moment came in the Naval War College (NWC) Archives. I was looking at a series of “fighting […]

  • Author of the Year

    I’m very pleased to announce that the U.S. Naval Institute has awarded me Author of the Year for 2018. It’s a great recognition of the value of Learning War and the work that went into it. The award ceremony was 25 April. I was fortunate to be able to attend, accept the award in person, and express […]

  • Learning War in New York Times

    I mentioned that Learning War has been getting some good press in my last post. Since then, it has appeared in the New York Times Book Review. I was humbled to be honored along with a series of other new military history books on 11 November, the 100-year anniversary of the end of World War […]

  • SMH 2018 and “Cross Functional” Officers

    I’ve been distracted by the publication of Learning War and the warm welcome its received, so this follow-up post on the Society of Military History’s Annual Meeting (SMH 2018) is later than I intended. What strikes me as I review my notes from the meeting is how “cross-functional” U.S. naval officers of the early twentieth […]

  • Strategy from “Inherently Erroneous” Conceptions

    A brief review of David G. Morgan-Owen’s The Fear of Invasion: Strategy, Politics, and British War Planning, 1880-1914 (Oxford University Press, 2017) I am very grateful for this book. David G. Morgan-Owen’s narrative provides much-needed clarity on one of the fundamental questions of World War I: How did the Royal Navy, the most dominant naval […]

  • On the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

    I’m excited to be on a recent episode of Vasco Duarte’s Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast along with Karl Scotland and Henrik Mårtesson. The three of us discussed strategy, doctrine, and decision-making in Agile and business contexts. Karl has some wonderful tools and approaches for what he calls Strategy Deployment (conceptualizing and promulgating a plan throughout an organization). […]

  • Thoughts from SMH 2018

    I attended the Society of Military History’s annual conference in Louisville, KY last week and it was a wonderful time. I enjoyed catching up with old friends, making new ones, and sitting in on some very thought-provoking panels. Learning Across Peace and War The conference’s theme was “Landscapes of War and Peace” so I put […]

  • Learning War is Coming!

    Learning War is Coming!

    I haven’t written here in some time, but I have been doing plenty of writing. My book on organizational learning in the U.S. Navy of the early twentieth century is being published by the U.S. Naval Institute this June and I’m very excited about it. What’s it About? Learning War: The Evolution of Fighting Doctrine […]