Author: trenthone

  • Weighing in on #NoEstimates

    I’m a big fan of the debates that have been triggered by #NoEstimates. It’s wonderful to have the dialog, even though many of us often end up talking past each other. I think the root of some of the misunderstanding rests in our assumptions about planning and how we think about risk. I like the […]

  • Nominated for Brickell Key

    I’ve been nominated for the Brickell Key Award! I’m tremendously excited about this. The award highlights excellence with Kanban, honoring people who have shown outstanding achievement, leadership, and contribution to the Kanban community. I’m also rather stunned. I don’t think of myself as having shown outstanding leadership or achievement. I really value Kanban though, and […]

  • I Always See the Gorilla

    By now most of you have probably seen one or more variants of the “Gorilla Video.” I’ll do my best not to spoil it in case you haven’t, as the experience can be quite illuminating. What I’ve always found most interesting about those videos is that I always see the gorilla, and in similar videos, […]

  • The Danger of Singular Attractors

    “Responding to Change over Following a Plan” That phrase is one of my favorites from the Agile Manifesto. In mulling it over the other day—and thinking about how to explain its value to others—I felt that a historical example could help explain the dangers of adhering too strongly to a specific plan when circumstances change. […]

  • Thoughts on Slack and WIP

    The other day, I was reading this excellent posting by Matt Heusser on the dangers and consequences of having too much work in progress (WIP). It mirrors my own experiences the past few months. I have a number of techniques in place to manage my own work and keep WIP at a productive level, but I’ve […]

  • How Can We Learn When Lessons Take So Long?

    Last week I was discussing the idea of software rewrites with a good friend. It was a relevant topic; different teams that we work with are being asked to, or are in the process of, rewriting various pieces of software. But our conversation wasn’t about the mechanics of rewriting applications; it was about the decision […]

  • What and When to Automate?

    This post springs out of a Twitter conversation with Marc Burgauer and Kim B. They will also be sharing their thoughts on what and when to automate (here and here, respectively). My simple answer is that automation is most valuable when it can provide rapid feedback into the decisions people make. When the question came […]

  • Making Sense of “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”

    I recently attended a Cynefin and Sense-Making Workshop given by Dave Snowden and Michael Cheveldave of Cognitive Edge. It was an excellent course and a useful introduction to how to apply concepts from complex adaptive systems, biology, and anthropology to better understand human approaches to problem solving. The Cynefin framework is an elegant expression of […]

  • Kanban Seder

    Kanban Seder

    Last week my wife and I hosted a Passover Seder. We have entertained together a number of times, but this was the first real attempt at a coordinated, sit-down meal. Most of our gatherings have been buffets, and less dependent on timing. We knew getting the timing of the Seder right would be a challenge. […]

  • “The Rules of the Game”

    The subtitle of the July 2013 edition of “The Scrum Guide” is “The Rules of the Game.”1 This is an ironic choice. The Rules of the Game is also the title of Andrew Gordon’s in-depth analysis of the Royal Navy’s performance during the Battle of Jutland, a performance that failed to meet expectations and led […]