More Speaking Engagements

It’s been a good year for speaking engagements to draw more attention to Learning War and the creative work my colleagues and I have been doing in the Agile community. I’ve also been able to spend a bit of time looking into and discussing Admiral Chester W. Nimitz and his approach to command, which had a profound resonance with the Navy’s approach to doctrinal innovation and learning in the mid-twentieth century.

Next week, I’ll be at Agile 2019. Joey Spooner and I will be taking attendees through an “Adventure into the Kanban Cadences.” It’s a fun and enjoyable simulation that helps people understand more about the different layers and feedback loops of a scaled Kanban system.

Later this month, I’ll be speaking at the Washington Navy Yard Museum and NWDC Carderock. The theme of both talks will be organizational learning in the U.S. Navy, as I developed it in Learning War. A key difference is that at the Navy Yard, I’ll be focused on the history, whereas at Carderock, I’ll focus on complex adaptive systems and implications for the future.

I’m excited for September. I’ll be at the McMullen Symposium again, this time on a panel based on a new Naval Institute Press book commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Leyte Gulf. My chapter in the book, and my talk at the conference, will discuss Admiral William F. Halsey’s decision to take his Third Fleet north and leave the exit to San Bernardino Strait unguarded.

Later that month, I’ll be discussing Admiral Nimitz’s approach as Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Fleet and Commander, Pacific Ocean Areas, at the National Museum of the Pacific War’s Annual Symposium. That’s been a very enjoyable project so far. My paper at the Society of Military History Annual Meeting earlier this year was a preview, but I’ve done a lot since then and I’m looking forward to sharing my ideas.

2 thoughts on “More Speaking Engagements

  1. Where would RADM Callaghan have been exposed to the info about the fighting strength comparisons between 3 NORTHAMPTONs and 1 KONGO? This really puts the events of 12-13 Nov 42 in a new light! Thanks very much, John

    • Yes, that is part of my argument. Callaghan was an experienced surface warfare officer and while he may not have seen that specific analysis, he certainly would have been familiar with the assumptions and logic behind it. Best, Trent

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s